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Bachelor of Arts in Psychology Online

Completion Time: Varies Credit Hours: 120 Tuition: $297.07 per credit hour

A degree in psychology can change your life.

Now the University of Texas of the Permian Basin—part of the prestigious UT System—makes it possible for you to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology completely online! And unlike other online university psychology degree programs, UTPB's online program is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and #3 among Texas public universities — and in the top 50 nationwide — Best Online Bachelor's Degree Programs by U.S. News & World Report.

Our online BA offers smart advantages!

  • Every course is 100% online
  • Tuition is affordable—just $297.07 per credit hour
  • Courses are only 8 weeks
  • Accredited by SACS
  • Choose from six convenient start dates

Develop real-world skills—right now.

The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology is designed to provide students with insights into the complex range and nuances of human behaviors, emotions and mental processes. Students pursuing their degree in psychology will gain knowledge about theoretical perspectives and empirical findings across a wide range of topics, learn how to apply research methods, develop critical and creative thinking skills, and explore the ethical principles that are the foundation of psychological approaches.

Learn from savvy professionals.

Every online university psychology course is taught by the same respected UTPB faculty members who teach on campus. And just as important, they are committed to mentoring their students. In fact, in the National Survey of Student Engagement, 99 percent of UTPB seniors reported that their professors provided prompt feedback on their academic performance. And our online bachelor degree programs earn high marks from U.S. News & World Report — #3 among Texas public universities and in the nation's top 50 Best Online Bachelor's Degree Programs.

Apply your knowledge to an interesting variety of professional fields.

Because psychology is a broad discipline, a degree in psychology prepares you for a wide variety of career opportunities—including counseling, management, law enforcement, marketing, sales, human resources, real estate and many other fields. Plus, you'll feel more confident knowing that you've prepared yourself to succeed in a very competitive job market. Research shows that individuals with a bachelor's degree earn more and have a lower risk for unemployment than their less-educated peers.

Online Courses


For the Bachelor of Arts in Psychology online program, students must complete 120 credit hours, including 42 hours of general education courses, 36 hours of psychology core courses, 18 hours of minor courses, and 24 hours of electives. View a list of available general education courses.

This degree program requires two science courses as part of the general education curriculum chosen from the following combinations: BIOL 1306/1106 and BIOL 1307/1107, or BIOL 1308/1108 and a second life/physical science lab course.

At least one of the science courses must be a biology course based on humans, such as anatomy or physiology. Zoology or botany courses do not meet this requirement.

Psychology Core Courses

The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology online requires a minimum of 36 hours of psychology core courses. The following courses are required of all majors (12 hours): PSYC 1301, PSYC 3301, PSYC 3404 , and either PSYC 4393 or PSYC 4394. This program also requires students to complete one course in five of the six following pairs (15 hours): PSYC 3403 or PSYC 4311, PSYC 3311 or PSYC 4306, PSYC 3321 or PSYC 4351, PSYC 3341 or PSYC 3344, PSYC 4302 or PSYC 3322, and PSYC 4304 or PSYC 4312.

Foundation for the understanding of basic psychological principles affecting human behavior (A prerequisite to all other courses in psychology).
Measures of central tendency, variability, correlation and hypotheses testing, with emphasis on the application of statistical methods to research in the behavioral sciences and education. Prerequisite: must have fulfilled general education mathematics requirement.
Introduction to the planning and execution of psychological research.
For psychology majors only. A capstone course to demonstrate application of research and APA writing skills. Students perform individually designed research under supervision of a Psychology faculty member. If not finished in one semester, the student may re-enroll one more semester with the permission of the supervising faculty.
Students interested in graduate studies in psychology, or interested in testing specific research questions, will develop hypotheses, design, collect, analyze and disseminate research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students are encouraged to present their work at the annual undergraduate research symposium. Prerequisites: PSYC 3404 and approval of faculty mentor.
Interrelationships between individuals and their social environment, considering social influences upon motivation, perception, behavior and development, and change of attitudes and opinion.
Variables involved in the development, maintenance and treatment of a variety of behavior disorders.
A survey of the theoretical views of Freud, Jung, Rogers, Skinner and various contemporary writers. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301
Developmental aspects of physical, mental, social and emotional growth from prenatal through adolescent periods. Recommended: PSYC 1301.
Examination of theories and research on biological, cognitive, social, emotional and personality factors that affect individuals from infancy through old age. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Major research results of classical and instrumental conditioning in animals and humans. Verbal learning, concept learning, problem solving and memory in humans will also be reviewed. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Major factors affecting the development of psychology as science of behavior, with emphasis upon philosophical roots of major psychological concepts.
Neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. Variables that contribute to behavioral effects in the areas of sensation, perception, motivation and learning.
Applications of psychological principles to industrial problems such as personnel selection and appraisal, employee motivation and satisfaction, and the influence of organizations on behavior.
Research and theories of cognitive processes, including concept learning, problem solving, memory, attention, and language development and maintenance. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Study of the structures and functions of the sensory modalities within the environmental context, emphasizing perceptual issues and psychophysics. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Major personality and intelligence tests, emphasis upon their construction, administration, scoring and interpretation. Prerequisites: PSYC 1301, 3301.

Psychology Elective Courses

For the 36 hours required in Psychology, the student must complete 9 hours of elective PSYC courses. Elective choices include:

Undergraduate courses which will be offered only once or will be offered infrequently or which are being developed before a regular listing in the catalog.
Interrelationships between individuals and their social environment, considering social influences upon motivation, perception, behavior and development, and change of attitudes and opinion.
Variables involved in the development, maintenance and treatment of a variety of behavior disorders.
A survey of the theoretical views of Freud, Jung, Rogers, Skinner and various contemporary writers. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301
Developmental aspects of physical, mental, social and emotional growth from prenatal through adolescent periods. Recommended: PSYC 1301.
Examination of theories and research on biological, cognitive, social, emotional and personality factors that affect individuals from infancy through old age. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
The purpose of this course is to help students develop an understanding of the various forms of child abuse, identify the underlying cause of this multifaceted problem, and to appropriately identify the types of services that will benefit maltreated children and their families. The nature and impact of child maltreatment, the ways in which society prevents or responds to it, and the system of response to child maltreatment are addressed.
This course will focus on psychological strengths and areas of personal growth among individuals, such as love, optimism, and self-efficacy.
This course is designed to study the social nature of sexual expression. It examines the concepts that help frame questions about a wide range of sexual behaviors, attitudes and ideals.
Students who are pursuing independent study or research as described in the contract study format.
Major research results of classical and instrumental conditioning in animals and humans. Verbal learning, concept learning, problem solving and memory in humans will also be reviewed. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Major factors affecting the development of psychology as science of behavior, with emphasis upon philosophical roots of major psychological concepts.
Neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. Variables that contribute to behavioral effects in the areas of sensation, perception, motivation and learning.
Pharmacologic basis of psychotropic drugs and their associated abuses. Theories of cause and treatment of abusers are reviewed.
Applications of psychological principles to industrial problems such as personnel selection and appraisal, employee motivation and satisfaction, and the influence of organizations on behavior.
Examination of the role of behavioral science knowledge and techniques in understanding, assessing, testing and preventing medical-psychological and social problems. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 or approval of Instructor.
An introduction to counseling skills and practices in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Research and theories of cognitive processes, including concept learning, problem solving, memory, attention, and language development and maintenance. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Study of the structures and functions of the sensory modalities within the environmental context, emphasizing perceptual issues and psychophysics. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Concepts in psychology as applied to an individual’s involvement in sport and other forms of competitive physical activity. Emphasis on motivation, stress management, personality theory, performance enhancement and group dynamics.
This course presents the preservice teacher with a general overview of exceptionalities of children and youth to include characteristics, etiology, and educational programs and practices. Topics will also include historical and legislative events affecting special education and an overview of the special education process including referral, screening, assessment, and educational planning. A field experience is included. Co/prerequisite: PSYC 3341.
This course studies the nature of language and the acquisition of language by the young child. Topics included are: (1) language structure, (2) sequence and process of the acquisition of language, (3) cognitive aspects of language acquisition and implementation, (4) social aspects of language in childhood, and (5) language variation. Prerequisite: PSYC 3341 or permission of instructor.
Major personality and intelligence tests, emphasis upon their construction, administration, scoring and interpretation. Prerequisites: PSYC 1301, 3301.
Overview of the ecological, evolutionary, and genetic aspects of animal behavior. Prerequisites: BIOL 1306/1106, 1307/1107, PSYC 1301.
Identification of the psychosocial factors related to the prevention of and recovery from athletic injuries and the development of counseling and referral skills needed when working with athletes and others in the sports medicine environment.
Examines psychological theories relevant to the law and other forensic activities and their use in society. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Survey of critical issues in social relations, mental health, and legal matters involving gender. Includes analysis of innate and environmental determinants of gender differences. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.
Undergraduate courses which will be offered only once or will be offered infrequently or which are being developed before a regular listing in the catalog. May be acceptable for graduate credit.
For psychology majors only. A capstone course to demonstrate application of research and APA writing skills. Students perform individually designed research under supervision of a Psychology faculty member. If not finished in one semester, the student may re-enroll one more semester with the permission of the supervising faculty.
Students interested in graduate studies in psychology, or interested in testing specific research questions, will develop hypotheses, design, collect, analyze and disseminate research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students are encouraged to present their work at the annual undergraduate research symposium. Prerequisites: PSYC 3404 and approval of faculty mentor.

Minor Option: Communication

18 hours are required for this minor, including 12 hours of upper division courses. Choose from the following courses.

This course enables students to analyze and practice communication in one-on-one relationships. Topics include problem solving, decision-making, working with diversity, information processing, understanding of self and others, and effective speaking and listening skills in interpersonal contexts.
Explores theories of rhetoric ranging from ancient Greece to modern times. Students examine different concepts of how rhetoric is a tool for public power as well as its use to transmit common ideas in the Western intellectual heritage.
Students are introduced to the relationship between modern media and their dynamic interaction with culture.
This course identifies the major areas of nonverbal communication and the current terminology used in the field. Relevant connections of nonverbal to other areas of communication will be presented.
An introductory course that surveys the history, development, and future directions of the field of communication. Equal emphasis is placed on understanding application of theory to everyday situations and learning introductory approaches to research.
Introduction to measurement and analysis techniques used in communication fields. Web-based research and dataset analysis and statistical methods.
The study and practice of communication strategies involved in preparing for and responding to crises. While a wide range of crises are considered, the course pays particular attention to corporate crises.
Survey of communication theory including approaches to understanding media influences on society and theories of human interaction.
An examination of the complex dynamics that drives messages in organizations. The course will focus on application of nonlinear dynamic approaches to human and mediated communication in an organizational environment.
An exploration of how various research techniques used to identify public groups are translated in messages in various media.
An exploration of the theoretical perspectives in understanding person-to-person communication. The course includes personal and professional perspectives.

Minor Option: Sociology

18 hours are required for this minor, including 12 hours of upper division courses. Choose from the following courses.

Students are introduced to the basic concepts and theories used to study the nature of social processes and the structure of society.
Measures of central tendency and dispersion, elementary probability theory, the binomial and chi-square distribution, tests of hypotheses and parameter estimation and simple correlation and regression. Emphasis is on the application of statistical methods to research in the social sciences.
This course involves the study of the development of sociological thought and perspectives through the examination of the ideas of classical and contemporary theorists; these may include Marx, Durkheim, Du Bois, Martineau, Parsons, Gramsci, or Lukacs among others. Substantive theories of social organization are examined.
Analyzes dramatic changes occurring in the work lives of Americans and considers the future of American workers within the global economy. Explores emerging labor markets and technology in shaping contemporary American work settings.
This course will consider the social consequences of the economic and environmental impact of energy choices in the U.S. and globally and how they shape societal norms and values. It will develop a critical understanding of the social attitudes, norms, values and behaviors toward energy consumption.
Focuses on theories of social inequality as applied to the exercise of power and large-scale social control. Issues of class, race and gender and other inequalities are considered in the U.S. and globally.
Relationship between political and social structures with emphasis on the concepts of power, ideology, elites, class, and politics.
Social and cultural factors associated with the definition, occurrence, and experience of health and illness. An examination of the social determinants that affect the etiology and distribution of illness and the social organization of the medical profession and the hospital.
The role of substance abuse in family violence, child rearing and marital discord. Various ways of intervening to moderate the effects of substance abuse in families will be discussed.
The course provides a comprehensive overview of social science research methods, with emphasis given to the concepts used in the conduct of research, measurement strategies, and research designs. This course includes a one-semester credit hour lab that focuses on the steps undertaken in the completion of a research paper. Required for all sociology majors.

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology Degree Plan (.PDF)

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